Kurukshetra


By: Sandeep Dahiya (LT-MHPS)

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I belong to the Land of Mahabharata. I have long thought to write about this amazing place, which may interest a lot of travelers for its prominence in Indian mythology. It is also known as Dharmakshetra (“Holy Place”). According to the Puranas, Kurukshetra is a region named after King Kuru, the ancestor of Kauravas and Pandavas, as depicted in the epic Mahabharata. The importance of the place is attributed to the fact that the Kurukshetra War of the Mahabharata was fought on this land and the Bhagavad Gita was preached here during the war when Lord Krishna found Arjuna in a terrible dilemma.

The best thing is that place is located on NH-1 around 170 Km from Delhi and is easily accessible through both railways and roadways. There are a lot of places of tourist interest in Kurukshetra. In fact it is a paradise for photographers, peace seekers and holiday goers looking for a short & sweet weekend trip. Best time to visit is from October to March as weather is pleasant during these months, though the place can be visited at any time during the year. Here are some places of interest:

Brahma Sarovar: Every year scores of people come to take a holy bath at Brahma Sarovar on the occasion of “Somavati Amavasya” (Sacred No-Moon Day that happens on a Monday) and on solar eclipse believing that a bath in holy sarovar will free oneself from all sins in one cycle of birth-death. It is supposed to be the world’s largest man-made pond. The world’s largest chariot of bronze is placed in Purushotam Bagh in the centre of the Brahma Sarovar.

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Sannihit Sarovar: This sarovar is believed to be the meeting point of seven sacred Saraswatis. The sarovar, according to popular belief, contains sacred water. Bathing in the waters on the day of Amavasya (moon-less night) or on the day of an eclipse bestows blessings equivalent to performing the Ashvamedh Yajna.

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Jyotisar: The famous site where Bhagavad Gita was delivered to Arjuna. A newly built tourist attraction which highlights some aspects of Geeta Saar through lights and sound.

The Holy Peepal tree – where you can witness the place where the Divine message of Sri Bhagavad Geeta by Lord Sri Krishna was delivered to Arjuna during the Mahabharata war. Sri Krishna Museum has some historical artefacts and paintings depicting the Mahabharata war.

Kurukshetra Panorama and Science Centre: A world-class panorama depicting the Mahabharata war with scientific explanations justifying every episode in the war. There are also several scientific exhibits designed to kindle a curiosity for science.

Dharohar: A must visit to know the tradition and culture of Haryana; located in Kurukshetra University.

Bhishma Kund at Naraktari: The kund is believed to be created by Arjun’s arrow to quench the thirst of Bheeshma while he lay on the bed of arrows.

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Sheikh Chilli ka Maqbara (tomb): This monument is maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India. It was built during the Mughal era in remembrance of Sufi Saint Sheikh Chehli, believed to be the spiritual teacher of Mughal Prince Dara Shikoh.

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Bhadrakali Temple: A temple that is one of the 51 Shakti Peethas. As per the story in Hindu mythology, the goddess Sati killed herself by entering the Yagna of Raja Daksha as a protest against the insult of Lord Shiva. Remorseful Lord Shiva wandered across the whole universe with the corpse of his beloved Sati on his shoulder. To bring him back to the original mood, it was necessary to destroy the corpse of Sati. Lord Vishnu cut the corpse in 51 pieces with his Sudarshana Chakra. The parts fell at different places where the temples of the goddess were later built by the devotees. One of them is in Kurukhsetra, where the ankle of the goddess fell.

There are other small places of interests also. Hotels with good amenities are available at reasonable rates. Haryana tourism runs rest houses (Parakeet tourist complex and Neelkanthi Yatri Niwas) which are also good options to stay.

Hope your next weekend travel is to this Majestic city!!!

 

**Referred from Internet sources (Mainly form Wikipedia)

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