Everyday


By-  Anonymous 

 

everyday-1

 

I woke up in my usual bed. It was a normal day. I took my normal route to work. I met my regular colleagues. I went through my usual routine of work. I left at the regular time. I took my normal route home.

Then I met Janm Singh. The normal, and the usual, and the regular all went out the window as fast as you could say ‘Shut-Eye’. Because, you see, Janm Singh was completely blind.

He was trying to cross the road along with me, and I held his hand and helped him across the road. Then, finding him following me along my normal route, I decided to accompany him. We struck up a conversation, and with me occasionally guiding him by his hand along the side of the road, we plodded along. The conversation we had simply opened my eyes.

I asked where he stayed, and he spoke of a place about 5 km from the place where we met. I asked him how he went home every day.

“I walk.”

My jaw dropped. I mean, here I was, grumbling about walking the 500-odd metres to my flat, and this man was talking nonchalantly about walking home every day, in his state of eternal darkness. My thoughts went immediately to an auto nearby, and I told him that I would gladly pay for his auto fare home.

He smiled, extremely politely, shook his head, waited for me to fall in-step with him, and continued walking, while we continued talking. The more I insisted, the more polite was his refusal, the wider his smile spread.

I asked him where he was coming from. “Work with the Blind Society in Delhi.” You travel back and forth everyday alone? He smiled back at me.

How long have you had this condition? “Ever since I was little I guess… Honestly, I don’t remember how long it’s been.” Who do you live with? “My mother and sister.”

Folks, this is probably starting to sound like a normal conversation.Well, it would have been, if it wasn’t for this mid-thirties-year-old blind man’s peace with his condition, and with the world. As I offered to walk him atleast about halfway to his home, he smiled and shook his head, and said he would like for me to go home and rest.

That’s when I began to smile. This man was blind and faced with a 5 km walk home, and here he was worried about me reaching home and resting!

We chatted for a little while more, and then we reached the point where we had to part ways. I stood and smiled at him. I blurted out my name and told him that it was nice meeting him. I meant it. And he knew it. He ‘saw’ my smile, and smiled back.Then he shuffled off.

I stood watching this symbol of human courage fade into the distance. I stood, and I stood. I didn’t want to lose sight of him. Eventually though, he disappeared around a bend, and I turned and headed home. I didn’t have a tear in my eye. I had a smile on my face.

Janm Singh looked at every day as an adventure. How do I know that? His smile spoke volumes.

And he gave me these parting words – “Sometimes, your kismet in life just goes… bad. But if you stop to mourn for yourself every time this happens, you miss out on the beauty in life.” A man who had probably no memories of the glorious sight of a streak of lightning across a cloudy sky, of the heart-warming sight of a child’s toothless smile, and no memories of his mother’s beautiful face; this man had found the real beauty within.My thoughts were with him, as I reached him, and went to bed.

I woke up in my usual bed. It was a normal day. I took my normal route to work. I met my regular colleagues. I went through my usual routine of work. I left at the regular time. I took my normal route home.

But suddenly, everything’s different. I think. I think about the power of the human soul, the faith of the human heart, and the all-seeing human mind.And then I see it too. Just as Janm Singh sees it every day.

The commonplace is the extraordinary.

One thought on “Everyday

Comments are closed.